Toy Persian Kittens, Teacup Persians, and Munchkin Persian Cats

teacup persians - not healthy

First, it is important to understand what the breed standard is for a Persian cat before we talk about what a "toy" or "teacup" or "Munchkin" Persian is. According to the Cat Fanciers' Association Persian Breed Standard "the ideal Persian should present an impression of a heavily boned ... and ... of cobby type, low on the legs, broad and deep through the chest, equally massive across the shoulders and rump, with a well-rounded mid-section and level back. Good muscle tone with no evidence of obesity. Large or medium in size."

Translation = The Persian cat is not a toy breed, but a medium to large, sturdy-short, compact cat. That being said, it is not a largest cat either (i.e., Maine Coon). Persian cats at adulthood will weigh somewhere between 7 - 13 pounds, depending on whether it is a female or male cat. However, Silvers and Goldens have always been smaller than other colors of Persians. An average silver or golden Persian female weighs 5-6 pounds. An average silver or golden Persian male weighs 7-9 pounds. Good breeders (those who show and are trying to improve the breed) are working to breed away from this small size as a Persian should be a medium to large cat as defined by the Cat Fanciers' Association Persian breed standard. To review the full Cat Fanciers' Association Persian Breed Standard in its entirety. (Adobe Reader is required to view the file).

When I spoke to my veterinarian about what made a "toy" Persian, I was told that it was a "genetic anomaly" or what used to be referred to as the "runt" of the litter. However, in recent years a few (so-called) "breeders" have selectively bred for this "trait" to produce the "toy" or "teacup" Persian. Furthermore, for every "genetic anomaly" that you see (like the dwarfism gene) there are other potentially harmful genetic anomalies that are not seen. In other words, it is WRONG to selectively breed for this particular gene.

The goal of any responsible breeder is to breed to the CFA Persian Breed Standard.  Otherwise, in my opinion, they are a "for-profit" business and are not focusing on improving the breed. Hobby breeders at breeding as a "hobby" and they breed for the improvement of their chosen breed.

WARNING: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A TOY PERSIAN, A TEACUP PERSIAN OR MUNCHKIN PERSIAN!

There have been quite a few websites where silver and golden Persians are popping up recently that claim to have toy or teacup size Persians for extraordinary prices for pet quality cats with inferior bloodlines ($2000-$4000+!). Silvers and Goldens have always been smaller than other colors of Persians. An average silver or golden Persian female weighs 5-6 pounds. An average silver or golden Persian male weighs 7-9 pounds. Reputable breeders (those who show and are trying to improve the breed) are working to breed away from this small size as a Persian should be a medium to large cat. However, some breeders are misleading unsuspecting pet owners into thinking this trait is rare, coveted, or new, and charging exorbitant amounts of money for their kittens. This is very wrong and it hurts the breeders who are honest about their kittens. This is not a business nor is it a hobby that someone can get rich from. Please if you think that raising beautiful Persians is a great retirement plan, DO NOT contact me. I am only interested in placing my Persians into a wonderful, loving pet home or with a serious, responsible and honest breeder.

"Warning" is courtesy of Gail Persinger of Kittikamir Persians and used with permission. Thank you Gail!

 

2 Comments on “Toy Persian Kittens, Teacup Persians, and Munchkin Persian Cats”

  1. My sister likes cats and she wants a Persian teacup for her birthday. It was explained here that teacup Persian cats are medium-sized cats and weighs around seven to nine pounds. Furthermore, it’s recommended to consult experts when planning to buy a Persian teacup.

    1. There is no such thing as a teacup Persian. A munchkin, teacup or miniature Persian or any animal that is bred on the dwarfism gene is considered a genetic anomaly and should never be bred on. That is the advice of top geneticists. Any person NOT breeding to an animal’s registries’ Breed Standard is unethical as they are people that breed for profit only, not for health, not for adherence to the breed standard, not for any reason but for money.

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